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Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Discovery MS as of 2/10/10

Hm. Now they're saying that the shooter wanted out of the play-time gang and that the victim was bullying him over this decision. But, read carefully. Most of the statements in the following article were made by the shooter's defense attorney - not the police.

http://blog.al.com/breaking/2010/02/madison_police_say_both_suspec.html

That doesn't make much sense to me. For starters, I read a comment this week from a kid who claimed to have witnessed an argument between the shooter and victim last Thursday. According to that comment, the victim told the shooter that being in a gang was "stupid," which made the shooter angry.

I'll allow for the possibility that the kid who posted that comment didn't hear correctly or whatever. But, his story actually makes more sense than what the defense attorney is peddling. The victim, by all reports, was well-liked, had lots of friends, and never got into trouble. There appeared to be at least some closeness between the victim and his dad as well as other relatives. I'm not saying the victim wasn't in the "pretend gang" like the MPD say he was - just that he wasn't typical gang material.

The shooter, on the other hand, was a misfit with few friends, had been transferred out of Liberty MS for undisclosed issues, and evidently had virtually no relationship with his parents. He was depressed and apparently spent a lot of time playing computer games. One of the shooter's few known friends, Chris Glover has photographs of himself throwing gang signs posted on his MySpace page. The shooter was exactly the sort of kid who doesn't just end up in a gang but thrives on being in a gang.

So, the shooter finally finds a place to fit in and, according to at least one eyewitness account, the victim tells him he's being an idiot. The next day, who shows up at school with a gun?

If the shooter had decided to get OUT of the gang, the gun just doesn't fit. According to the story, the shooter had received counseling which convinced him to get away from the gang. Wouldn't part of that counseling have included a renunciation of gang-style violence? I don't know - I'm just posing the question.

Consider this. The shooter's father is a doctor and very likely has the resources to hire a very good defense attorney. The victim was black and is dead. It would be easy for the shooter's legal team to throw the victim's body under the bus at this point - make him out to be a bully who harassed the shooter about quitting their gang. I'm not saying that's what's happening here, but it would be a common legal strategy. So far, I'm not buying into it.

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